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Rami Khouri

Rami Khouri

Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

Contact:
Email: rgkhouri@gmail.com

 

 

By Date

 

2011 (continued)

February 16, 2011

Biology of the Second Arab Revolt

Op-Ed, Agence Global

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

BOSTON -- As the ripples from the Tunisian-Egyptian popular revolts work their way throughout the Arab world in the months and years ahead, we should keep in mind two pivotal words that capture every important dimension of the process underway. The two words are “humiliation” and “legitimacy.” Like bookmarks at both ends of the process, they explain why the Arab region is erupting in revolts, and what needs to be done to satisfy people’s demands.

 

 

February 14, 2011

The Post-Mubarak Arab World

Op-Ed

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

BOSTON -- The overthrow of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and the transitions to new governance systems in Egypt and Tunisia -- with others sure to follow -- promise the birth of a more democratic, humanistic Arab world, assuming the transitions persist, which I believe is certain. Here are ten things that may emerge from the current changes and that will determine if real democratization is underway, for these are the attributes that the Arab people have been denied throughout the past century:

 

 

February 11, 2011

“Egypt is Free!”: The Post-Mubarak Future

In the News

By Ashraf Hegazy, Former Executive Director, The Dubai Initiative and Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

Ashraf Hegazy, Executive Director of the Dubai Initiative, and Senior Fellow Rami Khouri participate in a special roundtable broadcast with NPR On Point's Tom Ashbrook about the post-Mubarak

 

 

February 10, 2011

The Historic Moment of Reckoning

Op-Ed, Agence Global

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

BOSTON -- The moment of reckoning for Egypt and the modern Arab world is upon us -- this weekend in mid-February of the 11th year of the 3rd millennium AD, in the land of Egypt that has known nearly six such millennia of urban rule and nationalist sentiment.

 

 

February 9, 2011

Confronting Arab Old Men with Guns

Op-Ed, Agence Global

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

BOSTON -- The historic developments on the streets of Egypt in the past two weeks appeared in the last few days to reflect the modern Arab tradition of the enduring incumbency of men with guns. In the face of unprecedented challenges to the ruling elite, the government headed by President Hosni Mubarak is reminding the Arab world as a whole that this region must continue to be ruled by old men with guns. So in the ongoing battle for the destiny of Egypt and the modern Arab world, this week we can identify four principal issues that have risen to the surface of the debate about what should happen next in Egypt; two of them are bogus diversions, and two others are critically and historically important.

 

 

February 5, 2011

The Arab Military Is Not the Solution

Op-Ed, Agence Global

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

BOSTON -- Two of the most interesting things going on these days around the crisis in Egypt are happening outside Egypt. In the Middle East, leaders throughout the Arab world are anticipating demands for changes in their countries and are responding with pre-emptive measures that they expect will gain them enough time to remain in power and make sufficient adjustments to deflect popular discontent.

 

 

February 2, 2011

The Arab Freedom Epic

Op-Ed, Agence Global

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

LONDON -- What a supreme irony it was for me to be in London and Paris between Saturday and Tuesday this week, as the popular revolt against the Hosni Mubarak regime reached its peak in Cairo, Alexandria and other Egyptian cities. To appreciate what is taking place in the Arab world today you have to grasp the historical significance of the events that have started changing rulers and regimes in Tunisia and Egypt, with others sure to follow. What we are witnessing is the unraveling of the post-colonial order that the British and French created in the Arab world in the 1920s and 30s and then sustained -- with American and Soviet assistance -- for most of the last half century.

 

 

January 31, 2011

Hizbullah’s Government

Op-Ed, Agence Global

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

BEIRUT -- The new Lebanese Prime Minister-designate, Najib Mikati, has been widely portrayed in the international media as “Hizbullah’s man,” and his mandate to form the next government has generated considerable speculation about the consequences of a government formed in the shadow of Hizbullah, which means Iran and Syria to most people. Indeed, critics of Hizbullah and the Mikati appointment -- especially Sunni supporters of former Prime Minister Saad Hariri -- speak disdainfully of Mikati as the wilayet el-faqih prime minister, referring to the formal title (“rule of the jurisprudent”) of the Iranian supreme leader system. Hariri and many of the Lebanese Sunnis he represents see the events of the past weeks as a successful coup by Hizbullah to take over the government.

 

 

January 31, 2011

Tunisia Was the Trigger, Egypt Is the Prize

Op-Ed, Agence Global

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

BEIRUT -- In the long-delayed modern Arab revolt for dignity, rights and freedom, Tunisia was the trigger, but Egypt is the prize. The Arab popular struggle against autocratic security and police states that was finally initiated earlier this month with the revolt that overthrew former Tunisian President Zein el-Abedine Ben Ali has reached a critical point in Egypt during the past three days. Events reached their tipping point Sunday and are likely to lead quickly to a political transition that replaces President Hosni Mubarak with a new leadership that more accurately reflects political sentiments in the country.

 

 

January 26, 2011

The Palestine Papers

Op-Ed, Agence Global

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

DOHA -- The Palestine Papers being published this week by Jazeera Television and the Guardian provide important but many, often problematic, insights into several key aspects of the long-running Israeli-Palestinian negotiations to achieve a comprehensive, permanent peace agreement. Reading through the entire archive of over 1600 documents -- as I have had a chance to do at Jazeera Television in Doha this week -- provides a useful overview of, and insights into, the three principal actors in the process: the Palestinian Authority, the Israeli government, and American officials.

 
Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev.