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Rami Khouri

Rami Khouri

Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

Contact:
Email: rgkhouri@gmail.com

 

 

By Date

 

2011 (continued)

March 16, 2011

Saudi Troops on the Move

Op-Ed, Agence Global

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

BEIRUT -- The movement of Saudi Arabian and United Arab Emirates troops into Bahrain Monday is a cause for concern at three levels. It suggests that conservative Arab leaders in key energy-producing states are worried about the potential for unrest in Yemen to their west and Bahrain to their east to spill over into their countries. It accelerates the long-simmering ideological war between some Arab leaders and the Iranian government, with an unspoken but strong undertone of Shiite-Sunni tensions. It is likely to spark fresh internal tensions in some Gulf states where Shiite minorities will raise the level of their demands and protests. It is potentially good news, though, on two other fronts: Saudi Arabia is asserting itself and showing it can act decisively, and the United States is showing itself to be a marginal spectator in this process.

 

 

March 2, 2011

‘They Messed with the Wrong One Now’

Op-Ed, Agence Global

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

BEIRUT -- In the annals of modern history, a few moments stand out as pivotal to all humankind: moments when a single human being, during a fleeting moment of intense anger and humiliation, undertakes an act that manifests his or her determination to end the systematic humiliation they experience and instead seek a new life of dignity and full humanity. We can best understand the full causes and consequences of the current citizen revolt across the Arab world -- now reaching into the wealthy oil-producing Gulf states like Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Oman -- by fully appreciating the incident that sparked it: the desperate act of protest by Mohammed Bouazizi, the 24-year-old Tunisian fruit and vegetable street cart vendor who set himself on fire on December 17, 2010 to protest two consecutive and related acts that he felt accentuated his sense of abuse and humiliation by the Tunisian state authorities.

 

 

February 23, 2011

Bahrain and Libya Raise the Stakes

Op-Ed, Agence Global

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

BOSTON -- The continuing insurrections and revolts by enraged Arab citizens across the Middle East have now spread to Bahrain and Libya, and these two states raise significant issues that go beyond the existing implications of the overthrow of the regimes in Tunisia and Egypt. In different ways, both Libya and Bahrain are deeply associated with the world of Arab energy producers and exporters. So the anticipation of these countries’ governments implementing policies that actually reflect the opinion of their people raises the prospect that Arab wealth and Arab public opinion might soon converge -- with astounding implications for the region, but especially for Iran, Israel, Turkey and the United States and other major Western powers.

 

 

February 21, 2011

Second Chance in the Middle East

Op-Ed, Agence Global

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Sometimes in life you get a second chance to get something right, after getting it wrong the first time. The perception I get from discussions in Washington, with independent analysts and people in and close to the administration, is that the Obama team remains caught and wavering between two approaches: One is to forge ahead with a bold new policy that responds to the historic changes now rippling through the Middle East. The other is to broadly maintain established old patterns of American policy, especially vis-à-vis Arab autocrats and the Arab-Israeli conflict.

 

 

February 16, 2011

Biology of the Second Arab Revolt

Op-Ed, Agence Global

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

BOSTON -- As the ripples from the Tunisian-Egyptian popular revolts work their way throughout the Arab world in the months and years ahead, we should keep in mind two pivotal words that capture every important dimension of the process underway. The two words are “humiliation” and “legitimacy.” Like bookmarks at both ends of the process, they explain why the Arab region is erupting in revolts, and what needs to be done to satisfy people’s demands.

 

 

February 14, 2011

The Post-Mubarak Arab World

Op-Ed

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

BOSTON -- The overthrow of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and the transitions to new governance systems in Egypt and Tunisia -- with others sure to follow -- promise the birth of a more democratic, humanistic Arab world, assuming the transitions persist, which I believe is certain. Here are ten things that may emerge from the current changes and that will determine if real democratization is underway, for these are the attributes that the Arab people have been denied throughout the past century:

 

 

February 11, 2011

“Egypt is Free!”: The Post-Mubarak Future

In the News

By Ashraf Hegazy, Former Executive Director, The Dubai Initiative and Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

Ashraf Hegazy, Executive Director of the Dubai Initiative, and Senior Fellow Rami Khouri participate in a special roundtable broadcast with NPR On Point's Tom Ashbrook about the post-Mubarak

 

 

February 10, 2011

The Historic Moment of Reckoning

Op-Ed, Agence Global

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

BOSTON -- The moment of reckoning for Egypt and the modern Arab world is upon us -- this weekend in mid-February of the 11th year of the 3rd millennium AD, in the land of Egypt that has known nearly six such millennia of urban rule and nationalist sentiment.

 

 

February 9, 2011

Confronting Arab Old Men with Guns

Op-Ed, Agence Global

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

BOSTON -- The historic developments on the streets of Egypt in the past two weeks appeared in the last few days to reflect the modern Arab tradition of the enduring incumbency of men with guns. In the face of unprecedented challenges to the ruling elite, the government headed by President Hosni Mubarak is reminding the Arab world as a whole that this region must continue to be ruled by old men with guns. So in the ongoing battle for the destiny of Egypt and the modern Arab world, this week we can identify four principal issues that have risen to the surface of the debate about what should happen next in Egypt; two of them are bogus diversions, and two others are critically and historically important.

 

 

February 5, 2011

The Arab Military Is Not the Solution

Op-Ed, Agence Global

By Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow, Middle East Initiative

BOSTON -- Two of the most interesting things going on these days around the crisis in Egypt are happening outside Egypt. In the Middle East, leaders throughout the Arab world are anticipating demands for changes in their countries and are responding with pre-emptive measures that they expect will gain them enough time to remain in power and make sufficient adjustments to deflect popular discontent.

 
Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev.