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"Patterns of Political Support and Pathways to Final Impact"

"Patterns of Political Support and Pathways to Final Impact"

Journal Article, AgBioForum: The Journal of AgroBiotechnology Management & Economics, Special Issue: Biofortified Food Crops: Progress and Prospects in Developing Countries, volume 10, issue 3, pages 201-207

2007

Authors: Calestous Juma, Professor of the Practice of International Development; Director, Science, Technology, and Globalization Project; Principal Investigator, Agricultural Innovation in Africa, Robert Paarlberg, Advisory Board Member, Agricultural Innovation in Africa Project; Former Research Fellow, Science, Technology, and Globalization Project/Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, 2007–2008, Carl Pray, Laurian Unnevehr

Belfer Center Programs or Projects: Science, Technology, and Globalization; Science, Technology, and Public Policy

 

ABSTRACT

A hypothetical scheme is offered for predicting which biofortified food technologies will enjoy greatest political support or opposition and from which actors on the political landscape. Beyond political support, benefits to nutrition from biofortified crops will also require acceptance by both farmers and consumers, as well as adequate nutrient uptake. Keys are reviewed to strengthening these three non-political links in the chain of final success. A four-pronged strategy for moving forward is then offered.

 

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Full text of this publication is available at:
http://www.agbioforum.org/v10n3/v10n3a10-paarlberg.pdf

For Academic Citation:

Juma, Calestous, Robert Paarlberg, Carl Pray, and Laurian Unnevehr. "Patterns of Political Support and Pathways to Final Impact." AgBioForum: The Journal of AgroBiotechnology Management & Economics Special Issue: Biofortified Food Crops: Progress and Prospects in Developing Countries 10, no. 3 (2007): 201-207.

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