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"Analysis of Policies to Reduce Oil Consumption and Greenhouse-Gas Emissions from the U.S. Transportation Sector"

Motorists drive along Interstate 435 in Leawood, Kansas.
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"Analysis of Policies to Reduce Oil Consumption and Greenhouse-Gas Emissions from the U.S. Transportation Sector"

Discussion Paper 2008-06, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

June 2008

Authors: Kelly Sims Gallagher, Senior Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Gustavo Collantes, Former Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy Research Group/Enviroment and Natural Resources Program, 20072008

Belfer Center Discussion Papers

Belfer Center Programs or Projects: Energy Technology Innovation Policy; Environment and Natural Resources; Science, Technology, and Public Policy

 

ABSTRACT

For the first time in decades, Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards for passenger cars were strengthened in the United States in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). As the nation considers how else to address remaining oil security and climate change concerns, the transportation sector deserves considerable attention as the primary consumer of imported oil and the producer of a third of total U.S. greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions. This study examines different policy scenarios for reducing GHG emissions and oil consumption in the U.S. transportation sector. Using a variant of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), NEMS-ETIP, a number of policy scenarios were modeled using both the U.S. Energy Information Administration's "reference" case and "high-oil price" reference case. Quantitative estimates are provided of the impact of increases in fuel-economy standards similar to those contained in the EISA in combination with the likely impacts of two different economy-wide climate policies and several different kinds of taxes on transportation fuels. Even the most stringent policy scenario modeled here failed to prevent an increase in oil consumption and greenhouse-gas emissions in the transportation sector mainly due to the persistent trend of rising vehicle-miles traveled, but some policy scenarios reduced oil consumption and greenhouse-gas emissions significantly below the business-as-usual projection. In general, individual policies prove less effective than combinations or packages of policies. The macro-economic impact of policies is dependent on how carbon permit or tax revenues are used.

 

This paper is a product of ETIP's Innovation in Transportation project.

 

For more information about this publication please contact the ETIP Coordinator at 617-496-5584.

For Academic Citation:

Gallagher, Kelly Sims and Gustavo Collantes. "Analysis of Policies to Reduce Oil Consumption and Greenhouse-Gas Emissions from the U.S. Transportation Sector." Discussion Paper 2008-06, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School, June 2008.

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