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"Culture of China's Mediation in Regional and International Affairs"

This July 24, 2005, photo shows the meeting place of the 4th round of the 6-party talks on the North Korean nuclear issue at Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing.
AP Photo

"Culture of China's Mediation in Regional and International Affairs"

Journal Article, Conflict Resolution Quarterly, volume 28, issue 1, pages 53-65

October 2010

Authors: Xiaohui (Anne) Wu, Former Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2007–2010; Former Research Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2004–2007, Jason Qian

Belfer Center Programs or Projects: International Security; Managing the Atom; Science, Technology, and Public Policy

 

NOTE

This article has been accepted by and is forthcoming in Conflict Resolution Quarterly (October 26, 2010).

ABSTRACT

Currently there seems to be an increasing interest in and demand for China's mediation in resolving conflict. To certain extent, such a phenomenon is associated with China's re-emerging power. But more importantly, it is probably the style and skills of China's mediation that matter, which represents the emerging of a unique mediation culture, with China being its messenger. The paper examines key elements of such a mediation culture, using examples of China's mediation in regional and international affairs. The shaping of such a culture offers good lessons for mediators around the world who strive for effective conflict resolution.

 

Excerpt from "Culture of China's Mediation in Regional and International Affairs":

"China's relative absence, since its founding in 1949, from contemporary international mediation initiatives is likely a function of the non-interference principle. Until recently, the list of special envoys the United Nations Secretary-General has sent to various conflict-ridden or conflict-prone areas has included no Chinese. China has been more willing to play a supportive role in international mediation efforts instead of acting on its own initiatives. Large (2008) argued that China's current engagement related to conflict is arguably most consequential in post-conflct settings, where China has brought investment and effective infrastructure delivery and thus increased visible peace dividends. Driving the gradual change in this state of affairs is the country's increasing international status, coupled with the intensification of unresolved and newly emerging conflicts that are threatening its own as well as world security."

 

For more information about this publication please contact the ISP Program Coordinator at 617-496-1981.

For Academic Citation:

Wu, Xiaohui (Anne) and Cheng (Jason) Qian. "Culture of China's Mediation in Regional and International Affairs." Conflict Resolution Quarterly 28, no. 1 (October 2010): 53-65.

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