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<em>Nuclear Energy and Global Governance: Ensuring Safety, Security and Non-proliferation</em>

Nuclear Energy and Global Governance: Ensuring Safety, Security and Non-proliferation

Routledge Global Security Studies, Paperback Edition

Book, Routledge

March 2012

Author: Trevor Findlay, Senior Research Fellow, Project on Managing the Atom/International Security Program

Ordering Information for this publication

Belfer Center Programs or Projects: International Security; Managing the Atom; Science, Technology, and Public Policy

 

OVERVIEW

The book considers the implications of the nuclear energy revival for global governance in the areas of safety, security, and non-proliferation.

Increased global warming, the energy demands of China, India, and other emerging economic powerhouses and the problems facing traditional and alternative energy sources have lead many to suggest that there will soon be a nuclear energy 'renaissance.' This book examines comprehensively the drivers of and constraints on the revival, its nature and scope, and the possibility that nuclear power will spread significantly beyond the countries which currently rely on it. Of special interest are developing countries which aspire to have nuclear energy and which currently lack the infrastructure, experience, and regulatory structures to successfully manage such a major industrial enterprise. Of even greater interest are countries that may see in a nuclear energy program a 'hedging' strategy for a future nuclear weapons option.

Following on from this assessment, the author examines the likely impact of various revival scenarios on the current global governance of nuclear energy, notably the treaties, international organizations, arrangements, and practices designed to ensure that nuclear power is safe, secure, and does not contribute to the proliferation of nuclear weapons. The book concludes with recommendations to the international community on how to strengthen global governance in order to manage the nuclear energy revival prudently.

This book will be of much interest to students of energy security, global governance, security studies, and IR in general.

 

 

Praise for Nuclear Energy and Global Governance:

"A truly unique and excellent work exploring the international governance architecture needed for nuclear power to flourish.  Cutting across issues of nonproliferation, security, safety, and reliability, Nuclear Energy and Global Governance is essential reading for those wishing to comprehend the politics and policies behind nuclear technology."—Benjamin K. Sovacool, Visiting Associate Professor and Director, Energy Security and Justice Program, Institute for Energy and the Environment, Vermont Law School and author of The National Politics of Nuclear Power.

 

For more information about this publication please contact the ISP Program Coordinator at 617-496-1981.

For Academic Citation:

Findlay, Trevor. Nuclear Energy and Global Governance: Ensuring Safety, Security and Non-proliferation. Oxon, UK: Routledge, March 2012.

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