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"Dead Wrong? Battle Deaths, Military Medicine, and Exaggerated Reports of War's Demise"

Cpl. Brewer Gerald of 3/6 Kilo Company 2nd Marine Regiment, who was wounded by a roadside bomb, on board a medevac helicopter in southern Afghanistan, Sept. 2, 2011.
AP Photo/ Rafiq Maqbool

"Dead Wrong? Battle Deaths, Military Medicine, and Exaggerated Reports of War's Demise"

Journal Article, International Security, volume 39, issue 1, pages 95-125

Summer 2014

Author: Tanisha M. Fazal

Belfer Center Programs or Projects: Quarterly Journal: International Security

 

SUMMARY

Recent scholarship points to a drop in battle deaths over the past several centuries and suggests that war is declining. Improved medical care, however, has made battle wounds more survivable. War has become less fatal, but not necessarily less frequent.

 

The author has written a policy brief based on this article, "Nonfatal Casualties and the Changing Costs of War."

Read: Tanisha Fazal's blog post at The Monkey Cage: "The Reports of War's Demise Have Been Exaggerated."

Read: Andrew Sullivan discusses Fazal's article on The Dish.

 

For more information about this publication please contact the IS Editorial Assistant at 617-495-1914.

For Academic Citation:

Fazal, Tanisha M. "Dead Wrong? Battle Deaths, Military Medicine, and Exaggerated Reports of War's Demise." International Security 39, no. 1 (Summer 2014): 95-125.

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