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BCSIA Annual Report, 1999-2000: Bios

Annual Report Chapter, BCSIA Annual Report, 1999-2000

 

Other Chapters in BCSIA Annual Report, 1999-2000:

BCSIA: 1999-2000 ANNUAL REPORT
10. Bios



Board Of Directors

Graham Allison is the Douglas Dillon Professor of Government at Harvard University and Director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. Under the Clinton Administration, Dr. Allison served as Assistant Secretary of Defense for Policy and Plans and coordinated DOD strategy and policy towards Russia, Ukraine, and the other states of the former Soviet Union. He continues as Special Advisor to the Secretary of Defense. As Dean from 1977 to 1989, he built Harvard''s John F. Kennedy School of Government. Under his leadership, a small, undefined program grew twenty-fold to become a major professional school of public policy and government. At the end of his tenure, the School had a faculty of more than 100, 750 full-time graduate students, 700 participants in executive programs, and eight major problem-solving research centers. Dr. Allison''s teaching and research focuses on American foreign policy; defense policy; U.S. relations with Russia, Ukraine, and other newly independent states of the former Soviet Union; and the political economy of transitions to economic and political democracy. Dr. Allison has authored or co-authored more than a dozen books and 100 articles, including five recent books: Avoiding Nuclear Anarchy: Containing the Threat of Loose Russian Nuclear Weapons and Fissile Material (1996); Cooperative Denuclearization: From Pledges to Deeds (1993); Beyond Cold War to Trilateral Cooperation in the Asia-Pacific Region (1992); Rethinking America''s Security: Beyond Cold War to a New World Order (1992); and Window of Opportunity: The Grand Bargain for Democracy in the Soviet Union (1991). His first book, Essence of Decision: Explaining the Cuban Missile Crisis, first published in 1971, and significantly revised and re-issued in 1999, ranks among the bestsellers in political science, with more than 200,000 copies in print.

Dr. Allison has been an active advisor and consultant to agencies of government, beginning with the Department of Defense in the 1960''s. He was Special Advisor to the Secretary of Defense from 1985-87 and has been a member of the Secretary of Defense''s Defense Policy Board for Secretaries Weinberger, Carlucci, Cheney, and Perry. In 1989-90, he served as Vice Chairman of JCS Chairman Crowe''s Planning Committee on Strategy. Dr. Allison was a founding member of the Trilateral Commission, a Director of the Council on Foreign Relations, and has been a member of public committees and commissions, among them Massachusetts Governor Weld''s Task Force on Defense and Technology and the Carnegie Endowment''s Commission on Government Renewal. Dr. Allison has served as a Director of the Getty Oil Company, New England Securities, the Taubman Companies, and Belco Oil and Gas, as well as a member of the Advisory Boards of Chemical Bank, Hydro-Quebec, and the International Energy Corporation. Dr. Allison was born and raised in Charlotte, North Carolina. He was educated at Davidson College; Harvard College (B.A., Magna Cum Laude, in History); Oxford University (B.A. and M.A., First Class Honors in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics); and Harvard University (Ph.D. in Political Science). He has received honorary doctorates from Davidson College, Uppsala University (Sweden), and the University of North Carolina (Wilmington).

Robert D. Blackwill is the Belfer Lecturer in International Security at Harvard University''s John F. Kennedy School of Government. A former Associate Dean of the Kennedy School, he is faculty chairman of the School''s Executive Programs for U.S. and Russian General Officers and for members of the Russian State Duma; of the Executive Program for Senior Chinese Military Officers; and of the Kennedy School''s Initiative on U.S. China relations. He is an adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York; on the board of International Security; a member of the International Institute of Strategic Studies and the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations; on the academic advisory board of the NATO Defense College in Rome; on the advisory council of the Nixon Center for Peace and Freedom; and a consultant to the World Bank, the RAND Corporation and U.S. Government agencies.

He is the author of many articles on European security and East-West relations and co-editor of Conventional Arms Control and East-West Security (1989), and A Primer for the Nuclear Age (1990). His articles include "The Grand Bargain: The West and the Future of the Soviet Union" with Graham Allison, "The U.S.-German Security Relationship in the 1990''s," "Coordinating a New Western Strategy for the 1990s," "The Evolution of U.S.-French Relations," "American Diplomacy and German Unification," "Russia and the West," and "American Leadership in the New Era." His book New Nuclear Nations with Albert Carnesale was published in 1993 by the Council on Foreign Relations. Other books include Damage Limitation or Crisis? Russia and the Outside World edited with Sergei Karaganov, and Engaging Russia with Rodric Braithwaite and Akihiko Tanaka. He is the co-author of "Can NATO Survive?," which appeared in the Spring, 1996, issue of The Washington Quarterly and author of Arms Control and the U.S.-Russian Relationship (1996). His latest book with Michael Stürmer of Germany''s Research Institute for International Affairs is Allies Divided: Transatlantic Policies for the Greater Middle East (1997). His most recent publication, The Future of Transatlantic Relations (1998) was published by the Council on Foreign Relations.

A career diplomat from 1967, he had previously been a Peace Corps Volunteer in Malawi, Africa. During his foreign service career, he served as Director of West European Affairs on the National Security Council staff; Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs; Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs; and U.S. Ambassador and Chief Negotiator at the negotiations with the Warsaw Pact on conventional forces in Europe. He was Special Assistant to President George Bush for European and Soviet Affairs in 1989-90. In December 1990, he was awarded the Commander''s Cross of the Order of Merit by the Federal Republic of Germany for his contribution while at the White House to German unification.

Lewis M. Branscomb is Emeritus Director of the Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, and is Aetna Professor, Emeritus, in Public Policy and Corporate Management. He is Principal Investigator of a number of projects in the fields of information technology policy and both domestic and international science and technology policy more generally. His recent research has produced books that focus on evaluating and redirecting the Clinton-Gore technology policy with James Keller, on state government science and technology with Megan Jones and Dave Guston, on Korea technology policy with Young-Hwan Choi, and intelligent tranportation systems with James Keller. He continues to study research and innovation policy, as well as conduct research on university-industry partnerships in Japan and America.

Harvey Brooks is Benjamin Pierce Professor of Technology and Public Policy, Emeritus, in the Kennedy School of Government; Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics, Emeritus, in the Division of Applied Sciences at Harvard University; and emeritus member of the BCSIA Board of Directors. Dr. Brooks graduated from Yale University. He did graduate physics at Cambridge University, England, and at Harvard University, receiving his Ph.D. in physics from Harvard with J. H. Van Vleck in 1940. He was a Junior Fellow in the Society of Fellows at Harvard from 1940 to 1942, and a staff member of the Harvard Underwater Sound Laboratory from 1941 to 1945. He joined General Electric in 1946, where he served as Associate Head of the Knolls Atomic Power Lab. He returned to Harvard in 1950 as Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics. From 1957 to 1975 he served as Dean of the Division of Engineering and Applied Physics at Harvard. Besides numerous technical articles in the three scientific fields, he has published a book, The Government of Science (MIT Press, 1968) and numerous articles in the field of science policy. In 1957 he founded the International Journal of the Physics and Chemistry of Solids, of which he remained Editor-in-Chief until the mid-1970s. Since 1975 he has devoted most of his teaching and research effort to the field of science, technology, and public policy in the Kennedy School of Government. From 1968 to 1972 he was chairman of the university-wide faculty committee for the IBM-funded Program on Technology and Society. Brooks has served on many committees related to science policy, including the President''s Science Advisory Committee in the Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson administrations. Dr. Brooks is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and the National Academy of Engineering, and a Senior Member of the Institute of Medicine. He is a member of the American Philosophical Society, a member and former president of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Most recently Dr. Brooks has been a member of several committees of the National Academy of Engineering dealing with issues of technology in relation to U.S. competitiveness in the world economy. He co-chaired, with Dr. John Foster, the Committee on Technology Policy Options in a Global Economy of the National Academy of Engineering, whose report, "Mastering a New Role: Shaping Technology Policy for National Economic Performance," was released in March 1993. He is also involved in a research program at the Kennedy School dealing with the recasting of national technology policy. He is the author of numerous publications on global environmental policy and risk analysis. Brooks has received six honorary D.Sc. degrees from Kenyon College, Union College, Yale University, Harvard University, Brown University, and the Ohio State University. He is also the 1993 recipient of the Philip Hauge Abelson Prize of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Albert Carnesale is the Chancellor of the University of California, Los Angeles and a member of the BCSIA Board of Directors. Prior to his position at UCLA, he was at Harvard University for 23 years (1974-97), initially as Associate Director of the Center for Science and International Affairs, which later became BCSIA. He served at the John F. Kennedy School of Government as Lucius N. Littauer Professor of Public Policy and Administration, as Academic Dean (1981-91), and as Dean (1991-95). He was Provost of Harvard University from 1994 to 1997. His research and teaching have focused on international relations and national security policy, with emphasis on issues associated with nuclear weapons and arms control. After earning B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering at Cooper Union and Drexel University, he earned a Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering at North Carolina State University. Dr. Carnesale has held positions in industry (Martin Marietta Corporation, 1957-62) and government (U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, 1969-72). He participated in the U.S. delegation to the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (1970-72) and led the U.S. delegation to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation (1978-80), a 66-nation study of the relationship between civilian nuclear power and proliferation of nuclear weapons. In academia, Dr. Carnesale was professor at North Carolina State University from 1962-69 and 1972-74. He has consulted and written extensively on international affairs, defense policy, and nuclear energy issues, and has testified often before Congressional committees. He is co-author of New Nuclear Nations: Consequences for U.S. Policy (1993); Fateful Visions: Avoiding Nuclear Catastrophe (1988); Superpower Arms Control: Setting the Record Straight (1987); Hawks, Doves, and Owls: An Agenda for Avoiding Nuclear War (1985); and Living with Nuclear Weapons (1983). He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and of the International Institute for Strategic Studies, and he was a founding editor of the quarterly journal International Security.

Ashton B. Carter is Ford Foundation Professor of Science and International Affairs at Harvard University''s John F. Kennedy School of Government and Co-Director, with William J. Perry, of the Harvard-Stanford Preventive Defense Project.

From 1993-96 Carter served as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy, where he was responsible for national security policy concerning the states of the former Soviet Union (including their nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction), arms control, countering proliferation worldwide, and oversight of the U.S. nuclear arsenal and missile defense programs; he also chaired NATO''s High Level Group. He was twice awarded the Department of Defense Distinguished Service medal, the highest award given by the Pentagon. Carter continues to serve DoD as an adviser to the Secretary of Defense and as a member of both DoD''s Defense Policy Board and Defense Science Board, and DoD''s Threat Reduction Advisory Council.Before his government service, Carter was director of the Center for Science and International Affairs in the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and chairman of the editorial board of International Security. Carter received bachelor''s degrees in physics and in medieval history from Yale University and a doctorate in theoretical physics from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar.

In addition to authoring numerous scientific publications and government studies, Carter was an author and editor of a number of books, most recently Preventive Defense: A New Security Strategy for America (with William J. Perry). Carter''s current research focuses on the Preventive Defense Project, which designs and promotes security policies aimed at preventing the emergence of major new threats to the United States.

Carter is a Senior Partner of Global Technology Partners, LLC, a member of the Advisory Board of MIT Lincoln Laboratories, the Draper Laboratory Corporation, and the Board of Directors of Mitretek Systems, Inc. He is a consultant to Goldman Sachs and the MITRE Corporation on international affairs and technology matters, a Member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.William Clark is the Harvey Brooks Professor of International Science, Public Policy and Human Development at Harvard University''s John F. Kennedy School of Government. Trained as an ecologist, his research focuses on long term social learning to cope with issues arising through the interactions of environment, development and security concerns in international affairs. He has studies underway on the development of better assessment frameworks for use in the management of global environmental change and on the problems of monitoring and evaluating progress towards sustainable development. At Harvard, Clark has served as Vice Chairman of the University Committee on Environment, member of the Steering Committee of the Center for International Affairs, and Director of the Center for Science and International Affairs. Elsewhere, he co-chaired the sustainability transition study of the US National Research Council, and chairs the Design Committee for the Heinz Center''s report on the "State of the Nation''s Ecosystems." He is co-author of Redesigning Rural Development (Hopkins, 1982) and Adaptive Environmental Assessment and Management (Wiley, 1978); editor of the Carbon Dioxide Review (Oxford, 1982); and coeditor of The Earth Transformed by Human Action (Cambridge, 1990), Sustainable Development of the Biosphere (Cambridge, 1986), Learning to Manage Global Environmental Risks (MIT, 2001), and Environment magazine. Clark was awarded the MacArthur Prize in 1983.
> Richard Darman is Public Service Professor at Harvard University''s John F. Kennedy School of Government. He returned to the School in January 1998, having been a Lecturer in Public Policy and Management from 1977-80. In the intervening years, he served as a member of President Bush''s cabinet and Director of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (1989-93); Deputy Secretary of the U.S. Treasury (1985-87); and Assistant to the President of the United States (1981-85). His prior government experience included service as Assistant Secretary of Commerce in the Ford administration and staff positions at Justice, Defense, and HEW in the Nixon administration. In the private sector, he has been a managing director of Shearson, Lehman Brothers and a partner of The Carlyle Group (a global private investment firm), with which he remains associated as a Senior Advisor. He is a director of several public and private corporations and a trustee of The New England Funds and the Council for Excellence in Government. A graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Business School, and a former Fellow of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, he is the author of WHO''S IN CONTROL? Polar Politics and the Sensible Center (Simon & Schuster, 1996).

John M. Deutch is an Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He served as Director of Central Intelligence from May 1995-December 1996. From 1994-95, he served as Deputy Secretary of Defense and served as Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition and Technology from 1993-94. John Deutch has also served as Director of Energy Research (1977-79), Acting Assistant Secretary for Energy Technology (1979), and Undersecretary (1979-80) in the United States Department of Energy.

In addition, John Deutch has served on the President''s Nuclear Safety Oversight Committee (1980-81); the President''s Commission on Strategic Forces (1983); the White House Science Council (1985-89); the President''s Intelligence Advisory Board (1990-93); the President''s Commission on Aviation Safety and Security (1996); and the President''s Commission on Reducing and Protecting Government Secrecy (1996). He currently is a member of the President''s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology (1997) and the Chairman of the President''s Commission to Assess the Organization of the Federal Government to Combat the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction (1998). Dr. Deutch serves as director for the following publicly held companies: Ariad Pharmaceutical, Citicorp, CMS Energy, Cummins, Raytheon, and Schlumberger Ltd.

Dr. Deutch has been a member of the MIT faculty since 1970, and has served as Chairman of the Department of Chemistry, Dean of Science and Provost. Dr. Deutch has published over 120 technical publications in physical chemistry, as well as numerous publications on technology, international security and public policy issues.

Paul Doty is the Founder and Director Emeritus of the Center for Science and International Affairs and Mallinkrodt Professor of Biochemistry, and an emeritus member of the BCSIA Board of Directors. Professor Doty''s early scientific work began in the physical chemistry of high polymers but soon gravitated to proteins and nucleic acids. The discovery of the molecular resulting of DNA and its renaturation, on which much of modern recombinant DNA technology rests, is the best known work of his laboratory. He was one of the founding editors of the Journal of Polymer Science and the Journal of Molecular Biology, and he was a member of the Department of Chemistry during his first 20 years at Harvard. In 1967 he helped found the new Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, serving as its first chairman and Mallinkrodt Professor of Biochemistry. He retired from biochemistry in 1988 and has since been Professor of Public Policy in the Kennedy School of Government. In keeping with his interest in national and international security affairs and arms control that had their origin in his work on the Manhattan Project, Professor Doty became a member of the President''s Science Advisory Committee under Kennedy and Johnson, chaired the first committee of the National Academy of Sciences to oversee Soviet-American exchange in science, chaired the American Pugwash Committee in its early days, as well as a Soviet-American Scientists'' group examining arms control from 1965-75. In 1973, with the help of the Ford Foundation, he began the Program in Science and International Affairs at Harvard. It developed into the Center for Science and International Affairs in 1978. Professor Doty served as Director of the Center until 1981.

Shai Feldman is Head of the Jaffee Center for Strategic Studies at Tel Aviv University. He served as a Senior Research Fellow at BCSIA until October of 1997 and is a member of the Board of Directors. In 1989 he established and directed the Jaffee Center''s project on Security and Arms Control in the Middle East and was a Senior Research Fellow there. Dr. Feldman has written extensively on issues related to Israel''s national defense, nuclear policy, proliferation, and arms control, as well as on U.S. policies in the Middle East. He is the author of Israeli Nuclear Deterrence and a monograph on The Future of U.S.-Israeli Strategic Cooperation. Dr. Feldman has two recent books: Nuclear Weapons and Arms Control in the Middle East (MIT Press); and Bridging the Gap: A New Security Architecture for the Middle East, co-authored with the Jordanian scholar Abdullah Toukan. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Political Science at the University of California at Berkeley.

John P. Holdren is the Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy and Director of BCSIA''s Program on Science, Technology, and Public Policy. He is also Professor of Environmental Science and Public Policy in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and member of the Board of Tutors for the undergraduate concentration in Environmental Science and Public Policy. Trained in engineering and plasma physics at MIT and Stanford, he co-founded in 1973 and co-led until 1996 the interdisciplinary graduate-degree program in energy and resources at the University of California, Berkeley. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and he chairs the NAS Committee on International Security and Arms Control and the NAS/NAE Committee on US/India Cooperation on Energy. He is also a member of President Clinton''s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology and chair of its Energy Panel. He has been the recipient of a MacArthur Prize, the Volvo Environment Prize, and the Tyler Prize for Environment, among others. In December 1995 he delivered the Nobel Peace Prize acceptance lecture in Oslo on behalf of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs, which he served as Chair of the Executive Committee from 1987-97.

Deborah Hurley is the Director of the Harvard Information Infrastructure Project. Hurley was an official (1988-96) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in Paris, France, with responsibility for legal, economic, social, and technological issues related to information and communications technologies, biotechnology, environmental and energy technologies, technology policy, and other advanced technology fields. She was responsible for the drafting, negotiation, and adoption by OECD member countries of the 1992 OECD Guidelines for the Security of Information Systems. Prior to joining the OECD, Hurley practiced computer and intellectual property law (1983-88) in the United States. She carried out a Fulbright study (1989-90) of intellectual property protection and technology transfer in Korea. Hurley graduated from the University of California at Berkeley and received a law degree from UCLA Law School. She is a member of the Advisory Committee to the U.S. State Department on International Communications and Information Policy (and co-chair of its Working Group on Security, Encryption and Export Controls), of the Advisory Committee on International Science of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and of the Advisory Board of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC). She will serve as Chair of CFP 2001, the Eleventh Conference on Computers, Freedom and Privacy.

Sheila Jasanoff is Professor of Science and Public Policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government and the School of Public Health. She has written extensively on subjects of science, technology and environmental policy in America, Europe and India. Her publications in these areas include Controlling Chemicals: The Politics of Regulation in Europe and the U.S. (co-author), Risk Management and Political Culture, The Fifth Branch: Science Advisers as Policymakers, and, most recently Science at the Bar: Law, Science, and Technology in America. She is currently writing a book on the comparative regulation of biotechnolgy in the U.S., Britain, and Germany and is principal investigator on the NSF-sponsored project, Sustainable Knowledge about the Global Environment.
>Henry Lee is the Jaidah Family Director of the Environment and Natural Resources Program, within the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Faculty Co-Chair of the Kennedy School International Infrastructure Program, and a Lecturer in Public Policy.

Before joining the School in 1979, Lee spent nine years in Massachusetts state government as Director of the State''s Energy Office and Special Assistant to the Governor for environmental policy. He has served on numerous state, federal, and private advisory committees on both energy and environmental issues, and is working with private and public organizations, including the Department of Energy, Department of the Interior, U.S. EPA, the National Park Service, the Brazilian National Development Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank and is on the board of several corporations. His research interests have focused on electricity and water privatization, environmental management, global climate change, and the political economy of energy. He is the editor of "Shaping National Responses to Climate Change: A Post-Rio Guide," the report of the Harvard Global Environmental Policy Program and is the author of several research reports on electricity restructuring and the environment, including "Electricity Restructuring and the Environment," a 1995 discussion paper co-authored with Negeen Darani, and the recent paper, "Implementing a Domestic Carbon Tradable Permit System: The Obstacles and Opportunities."

Ernest R. May is Director of the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History and an authority on the history of international relations. He has been Professor of History since 1963 and Charles Warren Professor of History since 1981. In 1969-72 he was Dean of Harvard College and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. He was Director of the Institute of Politics from 1971-74 and Chairman of the Department of History from 1976-79. In 1997-1998 he was on leave, serving as Alfred Vere Harmsworth Professor in the University of Oxford.

Born in Fort Worth, Texas, Professor May holds A.B. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California at Los Angeles. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has been a consultant at various times to the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the National Security Council, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Smithsonian Institution, and committees of the Congress.

His publications include The World War & American Isolation 1914-17 (1959), The Ultimate Decision: The President as Commander in Chief (1960), Imperial Democracy: The Emergence of America as a Great Power (1961), American Imperialism: A Speculative Essay (1968), ''Lessons'' of the Past: The Use and Misuse of History in American Foreign Policy (1973), The Making of the Monroe Doctrine (1975), A Proud Nation (l983), Knowing One''s Enemies: Intelligence Assessment Before the Two World Wars (1985), and with Richard E. Neustadt Thinking in Time: The Uses of History for Decision-Makers (1986). In 1988 he and Richard Neustadt received the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order. His most recent publications are American Cold War Strategy: Interpreting NSC 68 (1993) and with Philip D. Zelikow The Kennedy Tapes: Inside the White House during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

In addition to teaching undergraduate courses on the Cold War and the Vietnam War and undergraduate and graduate courses on the history of international relations, Professor May teaches in the John F. Kennedy School of Government courses on reasoning from history and assessing other governments. In the Kennedy School he also directs an Intelligence Policy Program, studying relationships between intelligence analysis and policy-making.

Matthew Stanley Meselson is the Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor of the Natural Sciences. He received Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago in 1951 and from the California Institute of Technology in 1957. He was a research fellow and then Assistant Professor of Physical Chemistry at California Institute of Technology until he joined the Harvard faculty in 1960, where he conducted research primarily in the field of molecular genetics. Currently he is studying mechanisms of molecular evolution. Since 1963 Dr. Meselson has been interested in chemical and biological defense and arms control and has served as a consultant on this subject to various government agencies. He is co-director of the Harvard-Sussex Program on CBW Armament and Arms Limitation and co-editor of its quarterly journal, Chemical Weapons Convention Bulletin. Dr. Meselson is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, the Academie des Sciences (Paris), the Academia Sanctae Clarae (Genoa), the Royal Society (London), the Institute of Medicine, and the Council on Foreign Relations. He has received the Award in Molecular Biology from the National Academy of Sciences, the Eli Lilly Award in Microbiology and Immunology, the Alumni Medal of the University of Chicago, the Public Service Award of the Federation of American Scientists, the Legman Award of the New York Academy of Sciences, the Alumni Distinguished Service Award of the California Institute of Technology, the Presidential Award of the New York Academy of Sciences, a MacArthur Fellowship, the Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award of the American Association of the Advancement of Science, and the 1995 Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal of the Genetics Society of America. He has also been awarded numerous honorary degrees. Dr. Meselson is presently a member of the Committee on International Security and Arms Control of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences.

Steven E. Miller is Director of the International Security Program at BCSIA, and a member of its Board of Directors. He is also Editor-in-Chief of the quarterly journal International Security. Previously he was Senior Research Fellow at the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute and taught Defense and Arms Control Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is co-author of the book, Avoiding Nuclear Anarchy: Containing the Threat of Loose Russian Nuclear Weapons and Fissile Material, and of Soviet Nuclear Fission: Control of the Nuclear Arsenal in a Disintegrating Soviet Union. He is editor and co-editor of numerous books, including The Perils of Anarchy: Contemporary Realism and International Security, and Global Dangers: Changing Dimensions of International Security.

Joseph S. Nye, Jr. is Dean of the Kennedy School, Don K. Price Professor of Public Policy, and a member of the BCSIA Board of Directors. He joined the Harvard Faculty in 1964, and has served as Director of the Center for International Affairs, Dillon Professor of International Affairs and Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. From 1977-79 he served as Deputy to the Undersecretary of State for Security Assistance, Science and Technology and chaired the National Security Council Group on Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons. In 1993 and 1994 he was chairman of the National Intelligence Council, which coordinates intelligence estimates for the President. In 1994 and 1995 he served as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs. In all three agencies, he received distinguished service awards. Dr. Nye is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Academy of Diplomacy, and a member of the Executive Committee of the Trilateral Commission. He has served as Director of the Aspen Strategy Group, Director of the Institute for East-West Security Studies, Director of the International Institute for Strategic Studies, the American representative on the United Nations Advisory Committee on Disarmament Affairs, and a member of the Advisory Committee of the Institute of International Economics. Dr. Nye received his bachelor''s degree summa cum laude from Princeton University in 1958. He was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University and earned a Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University. In addition to teaching at Harvard, Dr. Nye has also taught for brief periods in Geneva, Ottawa, and London. He has lived for extended periods in Europe, East Africa, and Central America.

John C. Reppert is Executive Director (Research) for the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. He joined the Center in 1998 after serving nearly 33 years in the U.S. Army. His military duties included three tours at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, service as Military Assistant to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy, and as Principal Director of the Office for Russia, Ukraine, and Eurasia, concluding his service as Director of the On-Site Inspection Agency. He is fluent in Russian and has traveled for the last 25 years in all the newly independent states of the former Soviet Union. He received his Ph.D. in International Affairs from George Washington University; his M.A. in Soviet Studies from the University of Kansas; and his M.S. and B.A. in Journalism from Kansas State University. He is a military member of the International Institute of Strategic Studies and the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies.

Robert I. Rotberg is Director of the World Peace Foundation Program on Intrastate Conflict, Conflict Prevention, and Conflict Resolution at the Belfer Center of the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University and President of the World Peace Foundation. He was Professor of Political Science and History, MIT; Academic Vice President, Tufts University; and President, Lafayette College. He is a Presidential appointee to the Council of the National Endowment for the Humanities and a Trustee of Oberlin College. He is the author and editor of numerous books and articles on U.S. foreign policy, Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean, most recently Creating Peace in Sri Lanka: Civil War and Reconciliation (1999), Burma: Prospects for a Democratic Future (1998), War and Peace in Southern Africa: Crime, Drugs, Armies, and Trade (1998), Haiti Renewed: Political and Economic Prospects (1997), Vigilance and Vengeance: NGOs Preventing Ethnic Conflict in Divided Societies (1996), From Massacres to Genocide: The Media, Public Policy and Humanitarian Crises (1996), and The Founder: Cecil Rhodes and the Pursuit of Power (1988).

Robert N. Stavins is the Albert Pratt Professor of Business and Government, and Faculty Chair of the Environment and Natural Resources Program at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. He is a University Fellow of Resources for the Future and the Chairman of the Environmental Economics Advisory Committee of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency''s (EPA) Science Advisory Board, and a Member of: EPA''s Clean Air Act Advisory Committee, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the Board of Directors of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, the Board of Directors of the Robert and Renée Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, the Editorial Council of The Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, the Board of Editors of Resource and Energy Economics, the Advisory Board of Environmental Economics Abstracts, and the Editorial Board of Economic Issues. He is also a contributing editor of Environment, and the Academic Advisor for Environmental Programs of the Foundation for American Communications. He holds a B.A. in philosophy from Northwestern University, an M.S. in agricultural economics from Cornell, and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard.

Professor Stavins'' research has focused on diverse areas of environmental economics and policy, including examinations of: policy instrument choice under uncertainty; competitiveness effects of regulation; design and implementation of market-based policy instruments; diffusion of pollution-control technologies; and depletion of forested wetlands. His current research includes analysis of: technology innovation; environmental benefit valuation; political economy of policy instrument choice; and econometric estimation of carbon sequestration costs. His research has appeared in the American Economic Review, Journal of Economic Literature, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Ecology Law Quarterly, Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Resource and Energy Economics, The Energy Journal, Energy Policy, Annual Review of Energy and the Environment, Explorations in Economic History, Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, other scholarly and popular periodicals, and several books.
Professor Stavins directed Project 88, a bi-partisan effort co-chaired by former Senator Timothy Wirth and the late Senator John Heinz, to develop innovative approaches to environmental and resource problems. He continues to work closely with public officials on matters of national and international environmental policy. He has been a consultant to the National Academy of Sciences, several Administrations, Members of Congress, environmental advocacy groups, the World Bank, the United Nations, the U.S. Agency for International Development, state and national governments, and private foundations and firms.

Prior to coming to Harvard, Stavins was a staff economist at the Environmental Defense Fund; and before that, he managed irrigation development in the Middle East, and spent four years working in agricultural extension in West Africa as a Peace Corps volunteer.

John P. White is a faculty member of the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. Dr. White has held several senior federal government positions during his career, including U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense from 1995-97, Deputy Director of the Office of Management and Budget from 1978-81 and Assistant Secretary of Defense, Manpower, Reserve Affairs and Logistics, from 1977-78. Prior to his most recent government service, Dr. White was the Director of the Center for Business and Government at Harvard University and the Chairman of the Commission on Roles and Missions of the Armed Forces.

Dr. White also has extensive private sector experience, having served as Chairman and CEO of Interactive Systems Corporation from 1981-88 and, following its sale to the Eastman Kodak Company in 1988, as General Manager of the Integration and Systems Products Division and a Vice President of Kodak until 1992. Dr. White also spent nine years with The RAND Corporation where he was the Senior Vice President for National Security Research Programs and a member of the Board of Trustees.

Dr. White is currently a Senior Partner of Global Technology Partners, LLC, which, in partnership with DLJ Merchant Banking Partners, specializes in private equity investments in technology, defense, aerospace and related businesses worldwide. He also is a Senior Fellow at The RAND Corporation and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He serves as a director of Wang Laboratories and IRG International as well as the Concord Coalition and Center for Excellence in Government. He is a member of the Global Advisory Committee of Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Tokyo, Japan. Dr. White received a B.S. from Cornell University and earned his M.A. and Ph.D. in economics from the Maxwell Graduate School, Syracuse University.

Shirley Williams has been a Liberal Democrat member of the British House of Lords since 1993. She was a Visiting Professor at the University of Essex in 1994-95, and a member of the Advisory Council to the UN Secretary-General on the Fourth World Women''s Conference. She served in the British Cabinet (1974-79) as secretary of state for education and science, secretary of state for prices and consumer protection, and paymaster general, the House of Commons as a Labour MP from 1964-79 and as a Social Democrat MP from 1981-83. She co-founded the Social Democratic Party in 1981 and served as its president from 1982-88. Her published work includes Politics is for People (1981), A Job to Live (1985), and Ambition & Beyond Career Paths of American Politicians (1993) co-edited with Edward L. Lasher, Jr. In 1980, she hosted the BBC-TV series Shirley Williams in Conversation. In 1980 she was a fellow at the Institute of Politics (IOP), and was interim director in 1989-90. Williams focuses on issues related to the European Union, Central and Eastern Europe, North American politics, and careers in elective politics.

Staff
Arnold Bogis is the Assistant to the Director and Executive Directors at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. He received his B.A. in Physics from Johns Hopkins University in 1997. Arnold held various administrative positions before coming to Harvard, where he hopes to pursue an advanced degree in International Relations.

Michele Circosta is the Staff Assistant to the Executive Directors. She graduated summa cum laude from Hawaii Pacific University in January 2000 with a B.A. in International Studies and Justice Administration (pre-law). Prior to college, she spent four years in the US Army as a Vietnamese Linguist and Interrogator stationed primarily in Tokyo, Japan.

Anne Cushing is the Librarian for the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. She has been working in the Harvard library community for six years. Anne previously worked at the Harvard Botany Libraries as a reference and retrospective conversion assistant; and more recently she was the Automation Specialist for Widener Library''s Government Documents Division. She is the co-founder of the Boston Area Library Web Managers and the Secretary of the Harvard University Mac Users Group. She has a B.A. in English and Photography from the University of Massachusetts.

Steve Nicoloro is the Financial Officer for BCSIA. Prior to joining the Center, Steve worked at the Kennedy School in the Office for Budget and Finance where he was primarily responsible for overseeing the budgets for the School''s research centers. Prior to the start of his career at the Kennedy School, Steve worked within the Controller''s Office at Tufts University and is a veteran of the U.S. Air Force. Steve holds a B.A. from the University of Maine at Presque Isle.

Peggy Scannell is the Financial Assistant at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. She spent seventeen years working in the Director''s Office of Harvard Dining Services before joining the Center in 1989. Previously, she had been quite busy raising a family. Peggy enjoys travelling, most recently she visited Ireland and Las Vegas.

Anya Schmemann is Communications Officer for the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. She received a B.A. in Government and an M.A. in Russian Area Studies from Harvard. After graduation she worked at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York City as Assistant Director of the Center for Preventive Action - a Council initiative to study and practice conflict prevention. She coordinated two of the Center''s projects on Kosovo/Macedonia and on Uzbekistan/Kyrgyzstan/Tajikistan. After the Council, she moved to the East West Institute, also in New York City, to manage a large research and book publication project on Russia''s total security environment. Anya has traveled extensively in the former Soviet Union and is a member of Women in International Security and the Council on Foreign Relations.

Alper Tunca is the Administrative Coordinator at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs as well as the Assistant to Graham Allison. He received his B.A. in International Relations and French from Boston University in 1997. Previously, Alper worked in U.S. Senator John F. Kerry''s Boston office as Assistant to the Senator. Alper hopes to pursue an advanced degree in International Relations focusing on the Middle East and Caucasus regions.

Patricia Walsh is the Executive Director for Administration at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. She has been at Harvard for 17 years and has held several administrative positions. She worked in the Kennedy School Dean''s Office ending as Special Assistant to the Dean; as Administrative Coordinator of the Strengthening Democratic Institutions Project; and as Executive Assistant to the Provost. She has a B.S. in Elementary Education.

Table of Contents:

Director''s ForewordOverview

Environment and Natural Resources ProgramInternational Security Program Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program Strengthening Democratic Institutions Project WPF Program on Intrastate Conflict, Conflict Prevention, and Conflict Resolution BCSIA Events BCSIA Publications Biographies

 

For Academic Citation:

BCSIA. "BCSIA Annual Report, 1999-2000: Bios." BCSIA Annual Report, 1999-2000. Cambridge: BCSIA.

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<em>International Security</em>

The winter 2013/14 issue of the quarterly journal International Security is now available!

Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Russian President Mikhail Gorbachev.