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"Russia Watch, No. 5"

Bulletin 5, Strengthening Democratic Institutions Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Russia Watch

Belfer Center Programs or Projects: Strengthening Democratic Institutions Project

 

The contrast between the Clinton Administration''s eagerness to meet with Russian President Yeltsin and the Bush Administration''s announcement that the first meeting with President Putin would come "in due time" at the July G-8 summit signifies an important turning point in U.S. relations. Clinton''s readiness to proclaim Russia a democratic, strategic partner contrasts sharply with President Bush''s downgrading of Russia from partner status to potential adversary, or even threat. Heated rhetoric from both sides in recent weeks has led some observers to forecast the advent of a "new Cold War." While highlighting differences over key policy issues like American missile defense or Russia''s nuclear cooperation with Iran, the "war of words" has overshadowed many areas for mutually beneficial cooperation that exist today.

This issue of Russia Watch offers an analysis of the state of U.S.-Russian relations and discusses prospects for future cooperation, featuring commentary from leading analysts. We are particularly pleased to present articles by Russian Ambassador to the United States Yuri Ushakov and U.S. Ambassador to Russia James Collins. Other commentaries include:
Andrei Ryabov, Why the U.S. should offer Russia a new program of cooperation, p. 15
Viktor Peshkov, The rhetoric of confrontation is heating up, p. 16
Vyacheslav Nikonov, Putin''s foreign policy doctrine is Russian Gaullism, p. 18
Sergei Markov, Russia is revamping its foreign policy, p. 19
Alexei Kara-Murza, Putin faces pressure to turn against the West, p. 23
Leontii Byzov, Contempt mixes with envy in Russian attitudes toward America, p. 24
Vladimir Boxer, Why Russians are suspicious of globalization, p. 25.

We invite readers to submit comments and suggestions to Russia Watch editor Ben Dunlap at ben_dunlap@harvard.edu.

We hope you find this issue of Russia Watch informative and interesting.

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For Academic Citation:

SDI Project. "Russia Watch, No. 5." Strengthening Democratic Institutions Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School.

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