Belfer Center Home > Publications > Academic Papers & Reports > Journal Articles > Population Growth, Environmental Degradation, and State-Sponsored Violence: The Case of Kenya, 1991-93

EmailEmail   PrintPrint Bookmark and Share

 
"Population Growth, Environmental Degradation, and State-Sponsored Violence: The Case of Kenya, 1991-93"

"Population Growth, Environmental Degradation, and State-Sponsored Violence: The Case of Kenya, 1991-93"

Journal Article, International Security, volume 23, issue 2, pages 80-119

Fall 1998

Author: Colin H. Kahl

Belfer Center Programs or Projects: International Security; Quarterly Journal: International Security

 

ABSTRACT

Colin Kahl of Columbia University examines the influence of demographic and environmental stress on the outbreak of civil strife in developing countries. Kahl contends that under certain conditions state elites will seek to exploit the destabilizing effects of natural resource scarcity and social grievances to instigate ethnic conflict when their political base seems threatened. Kahl tests his “state exploitation hypothesis” using the case of Kenya, where from 1991 to 1993 widespread ethnic violence erupted between ethnic groups allied with President Daniel arap Moi and those traditionally associated with his opponents. According to Kahl, these clashes can be traced directly to the regime’s determination to exploit environmentally and demographically induced scarcity to ensure its political survival.

 

For more information about this publication please contact the IS Editorial Assistant at 617-495-1914.

For Academic Citation:

Colin H. Kahl. "Population Growth, Environmental Degradation, and State-Sponsored Violence: The Case of Kenya, 1991-93." International Security 23, no. 2 (Fall 1998): 80-119.

Bookmark and Share

SUBSCRIBE

Receive email updates on the most pressing topics in science and int'l affairs.

<em>International Security</em>

The winter 2013/14 issue of the quarterly journal International Security is now available!

Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Russian President Mikhail Gorbachev.